Oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology
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Lymphoma - Non-Hodgkin

This section has been reviewed and approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 9/2013
Late Effects of Treatment

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ON THIS PAGE: You will find out more about side effects that can occur long after treatment for this type of lymphoma has ended. To see other pages in this guide, use the colored boxes on the right side of your screen, or click “Next” at the bottom.

Patients who have been treated for lymphoma have an increased risk of developing other diseases or conditions later in life, as chemotherapy and radiation therapy can cause permanent damage to healthy parts of the body. Treatments have improved in the last 30 years, and now patients who have received treatment for lymphoma are less likely to experience late effects; however, there is still some risk. Therefore, it is important that people receive follow-up care to watch for the late effects explained below.

  • People who have received radiation therapy to the pelvis, high doses of cyclophosphamide, and high-dose chemotherapy for stem cell transplantation are at risk for infertility (inability to have children). Learn more about fertility and cancer treatment.
  • All survivors of lymphoma have a higher risk than the general population of developing a secondary cancer. This increased risk continues for up to 20 years after treatment. The most common secondary cancers include cancer of the lung, brain, kidney, or bladder; melanoma; Hodgkin lymphoma; or leukemia.
  • Women who have received radiation therapy to the chest before age 35 have an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • Patients who have received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy or radiation treatment to the chest may be at higher risk for developing heart problems.
  • Adults who have received chemotherapy, such as alkylating agents and methotrexate (multiple brand names), or radiation therapy to the chest area may be at risk for lung damage and shortness of breath later in life.
  • Patients who have received radiation therapy to the neck have an increased risk of low levels of thyroid hormones later in life.
  • Patients who have received stem cell transplantation may be at higher risk for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Children who have received radiation therapy and chemotherapy to the brain and spinal cord area may be at risk for growth problems, learning disabilities, and delayed puberty. Teenagers who receive chemotherapy may be at higher risk for low sperm counts (for boys) or damage to the ovaries (for girls).
  • Children who have received total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the stem cell transplantation process may experience thyroid problems.

Learn more about late effects of cancer treatment.

To continue reading this guide, choose “Next” (below, right) to see a section about what tests and check-ups you need after you’ve finished cancer treatment to help identify and manage these late effects. Or, use the colored boxes located on the right side of your screen to visit any section.

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