ASCO Annual Meeting

Lenvatinib Could Be a New Option for Patients with Differentiated Radioiodine-Resistant Thyroid Cancer

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 31, 2014

Results from a recent study show that the drug lenvatinib could become a new, effective treatment option for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer that is resistant to standard radioiodine (RAI) therapy. Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common subtype of thyroid cancer. It is generally curable with surgery and RAI. However, about 5% to 15% of patients with this subtype develop resistance to RAI, which means that it is no longer able to control the cancer’s growth.

Taking Zoledronic Acid Less Often After the First Year of Treatment Is Safe for Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2014

According to new findings from a phase III clinical trial, women taking zoledronic acid (Zometa) for breast cancer that has spread to the bone, called metastases, can safely scale back to a once-every-three-months schedule after finishing a year of monthly treatments.

Certain People with HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancer May Benefit From a Lower Dose of Radiation Therapy

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2014

Early research suggests that lowering the dose of radiation therapy for some people with oropharyngeal cancer is an effective treatment option and may help reduce long-term side effects. This new approach customizes the radiation dose based on a person’s response to initial chemotherapy, as well as other factors known to affect a person’s chance of recovery, such as whether the tumor has tested positive for the human papillomavirus (HPV), the tumor’s size, and the person’s smoking history.

Caregivers who Receive Palliative Care Support Immediately After an Advanced Cancer Diagnosis Have a Better Quality of Life

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2014

A new study demonstrates the benefits of a phone-based palliative care support program for caregivers of people with advanced cancer. The results suggest that the earlier palliative care services are introduced to caregivers, the better they will be able to cope with the caregiving experience.

Stopping the Use of Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Near the End of Life Improves Quality of Life

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2014

According to new research, people who are expected to live less than a year can safely stop taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, without shortening their lives. In fact, discontinuing statins provided a number of important benefits, including reducing symptoms, having to take fewer pills, and improving overall quality of life.

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