Childhood Cancer

Preliminary Study Shows that the Lung Cancer Drug, Crizotinib, Is Effective for Three Childhood Cancers

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 16, 2012

In an early study with the targeted therapy drug crizotinib (Xalkori), researchers found that it stopped the growth of neuroblastoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT), and in some instances, removed all signs of the cancer.

Large Study Shows Progressive Increases in Long-Term Survival for Children With Leukemia

JCO Research Round Up
March 12, 2012

A new, long-term study shows that survival rates for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of pediatric cancer, climbed steadily between 1990 and 2005. This analysis is the largest study to date of ALL survival, exploring important survival gains based on patient age, race, ethnicity, and subtype of ALL. The findings were published March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

New High-Dose Chemotherapy Regimen Helps Children With Neuroblastoma Live Longer

ASCO Annual Meeting
June 5, 2011

A recent study showed that children with high-risk neuroblastoma who received the drugs busulphan (Busulfex, Mitosan, Myleran) and melphalan (Alkeran) lived longer than children who received the drugs carboplatin (Paraplat, Paraplatin), etoposide (Toposar, VePesid), and melphalan, a regimen called CEM. High-risk means that the neuroblastoma is likely to worsen or recur (come back after treatment). These combinations of drugs are given in high doses to kill cancer cells in the bone marrow (spongy, red tissue inside of bones).

New Chemotherapy Regimen Reduces Recurrence of ALL for Children and Young Adults

ASCO Annual Meeting
June 3, 2011

A new study shows that using high-dose methotrexate (multiple brand names) for children and young adults with a type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) called high risk B-precursor ALL reduces the risk of recurrence when compared with the standard methotrexate regimen. Recurrence is when the ALL comes back after treatment.

Technique Enables Previously Sterile Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer to Father Children

JCO Research Round Up
March 14, 2011

A new study has shown that a surgical technique can effectively locate and extract viable sperm in more than one-third of adult survivors of childhood cancer, who were previously considered sterile due to prior chemotherapy. Many of these men were subsequently able to have children with the help of in vitro fertilization, and the results offer a proven option for many male cancer survivors who want to be fathers but were thought infertile. 

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