Genitourinary Cancers Sympsium

Vigorous Exercise Linked With Difference in How Genes in the Prostate Affect the Body

A new study showed that men with early-stage prostate cancer who exercise vigorously at least three hours a week have genes that are expressed differently in the prostate than those who do not exercise as intensely. Genes are small individual collections of information within each cell of the human body. How these genes affect the body is called gene expression.

Drug That Targets How Cancer Grows Lengthens Lives of Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

A new drug was shown to help men with metastatic prostate cancer live longer in a recent clinical trial. Metastatic prostate cancer is cancer that has spread outside the prostate and is often difficult to treat. The drug called MDV3100 was designed to prevent male sex hormones called androgens, such as testosterone, from helping the cancer grow and spread.

Initial PSA Measurement Could Help Guide Further Prostate Cancer Testing

In a large European study, researchers looked at using first-time prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels as a way to guide future screening for prostate cancer. PSA is a protein found in higher-than-normal levels in men with prostate cancer and some noncancerous prostate conditions. Men with higher-than-normal PSA levels may be recommended for a biopsy (removal of a small piece of tissue for examination under a microscope) to look for cancer.

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