Leukemia

New Treatment, Pacritinib, Helps Ease Myelofibrosis Symptoms

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2015

A recent study showed that the drug pacritinib works better for myelofibrosis than current treatments. Myelofibrosis is a rare blood cancer that develops when the bone marrow is unable to make enough blood cells. As a result, the spleen takes over the role of making blood cells but becomes quite enlarged. Patients also often experience tiredness, weakness, shortness of breath, fever, and weight loss because of an enlarged spleen. In addition, myelofibrosis turns into acute leukemia in about a third of patients with this disease.

Adding Ibrutinib to Standard Treatment Lowers the Risk of Dying from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 30, 2015

In a large, ongoing study, researchers found that a combination of ibrutinib (Imbruvica) and standard treatment slows the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and lowers patients’ risk of dying from the disease. The standard treatment for CLL is usually a combination of bendamustine (Treanda) and rituximab (Rituxan), a regimen called BR.

For Older Patients with CLL, Ibrutinib May Be an Effective New Treatment Option

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 31, 2014

Early results from an ongoing study show that ibrutinib (Imbruvica) keeps relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) from worsening for longer than ofatumumab (Arzerra), a standard treatment option for relapsed or refractory CLL. CLL is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Relapsed CLL is when the disease returns after remission, a time when there are no signs or symptoms of the disease. Refractory CLL is when the disease worsens despite treatment.

New Targeted Therapy for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Shows Promise

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 15, 2013

In early, ongoing research, the drug, idelalisib helped to shrink tumors for patients with recurrent or treatment-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL is a slow-growing cancer and many patients do not need treatment until they start having symptoms. However, after treatment, most patients will have the disease come back, called recurrent or relapsed CLL. About 20% of patients will develop treatment-resistant or refractory CLL, meaning the disease comes back quickly or the original treatment did not work.

New Chemotherapy Regimen Reduces Recurrence of ALL for Children and Young Adults

ASCO Annual Meeting
June 3, 2011

A new study shows that using high-dose methotrexate (multiple brand names) for children and young adults with a type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) called high risk B-precursor ALL reduces the risk of recurrence when compared with the standard methotrexate regimen. Recurrence is when the ALL comes back after treatment.

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