Oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology

Prostate Cancer

Vigorous Exercise Linked With Difference in How Genes in the Prostate Affect the Body

A new study showed that men with early-stage prostate cancer who exercise vigorously at least three hours a week have genes that are expressed differently in the prostate than those who do not exercise as intensely. Genes are small individual collections of information within each cell of the human body. How these genes affect the body is called gene expression.

Drug That Targets How Cancer Grows Lengthens Lives of Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

A new drug was shown to help men with metastatic prostate cancer live longer in a recent clinical trial. Metastatic prostate cancer is cancer that has spread outside the prostate and is often difficult to treat. The drug called MDV3100 was designed to prevent male sex hormones called androgens, such as testosterone, from helping the cancer grow and spread.

Cabozantinib Helps Manage Several Advanced Cancers and Shrink Bone Metastases

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 18, 2011

In a recent study, the drug cabozantinib helped manage various advanced cancers, particularly prostate, ovarian, and liver cancers. The drug also helped shrink bone metastases (cancer that has spread to the bone). Cabozantinib is a type of targeted therapy, which means it targets the cancer's specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival.

New Way to Use PSA May Predict Risk of Metastatic Prostate Cancer or Prostate Cancer-Related Death

A large study of more than 12,000 Swedish men showed that first-time prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels for men age 44 to 50 predicts the chance of developing metastatic prostate cancer (cancer that has spread to other parts of the body) or dying of the disease up to 30 years later. PSA is found in higher-than-normal levels in men with various conditions of the prostate, including prostate cancer and noncancerous conditions.

Researchers Find Many Elderly Men Undergo Unnecessary PSA Screening

JCO Research Round Up
March 28, 2011

A new study on the use of PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing to screen for prostate cancer found that elderly men are being screened much more frequently than men in their early fifties, even though younger men are more likely to benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Researchers showed that men in their seventies underwent PSA screening for prostate cancer at nearly twice the rate of men in their early fifties. Men 85 and older were screened just as often.

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