Oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology

Treatment

Hormonal Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

Introduction

To help doctors give their patients the best possible care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) developed evidence-based recommendations about hormonal therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This guideline has been updated several times since the original version in 2002. The latest update provides additional guidance on how long women can take tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamox). This guide for patients is based on the most recent recommendations.

Key Messages:

Treatment of Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

To help doctors give their patients the best possible care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) asks its medical experts to develop evidence-based recommendations about specific topics in cancer care. These recommendations are for the treatment of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast. This guide for patients and caregivers is based on ASCO's recommendations.

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Chemotherapy Doses for Obese Patients With Cancer

To help doctors give their patients the best possible care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) developed evidence-based recommendations on giving doses of chemotherapy that are based on a patient's actual weight. This guide for patients is based on ASCO recommendations and is intended for people who are obese.

Key Messages

ASCO Recommends Palliative Care as a Part of Cancer Treatment

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has issued a provisional clinical opinion recommending that palliative care be offered along with treatment to slow, stop, or eliminate the cancer for patients with metastatic cancer (cancer that has spread) when diagnosed and those who have many or severe symptoms. A provisional clinical opinion offers direction to doctors and others who treat people with cancer after the publication or presentation of information that could change testing or treatment decisions.

Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

September 2011

To help doctors give their patients the best possible care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) developed evidence-based recommendations on the treatment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. This guide for patients contains several recommendations, one of which was updated in September 2011.

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Tests to Help Choose Chemotherapy

To help doctors give their patients the best possible care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) developed evidence-based recommendations on the usefulness of laboratory tests (called assays) to find out if a cancer might be resistant or sensitive to a specific chemotherapy treatment before it is offered to a patient. In 2011, this guideline was reviewed due to new research; this research continued to support the 2004 recommendations. This guide for patients is based on ASCO's most recent recommendations.

Key Messages

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Testing for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Introduction

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has issued a provisional clinical opinion on using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) testing to help predict the benefit of treating patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. A provisional clinical opinion offers direction to doctors and others who treat people with cancer after the publication or presentation of information that could change testing or treatment decisions.

Expert Perspective from ASCO on the Removal of Lymph Nodes for Breast Cancer

On February 9, 2011, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published the results of a randomized clinical trial showing that axillary dissection (the removal and analysis of the lymph nodes under the arm) for patients with breast cancer did not increase overall survival or lead to fewer recurrences (return of the cancer after treatment).

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