Research Summaries

This section contains the latest highlighted research for patients from ASCO medical journals, including the Journal of Clinical Oncology, as well as an archive of research highlights from previous ASCO scientific meetings (2011-2015). For the latest research highlights from more recent ASCO meetings, visit the Cancer.Net Blog or check out Cancer.Net’s audio podcasts and videos for patients.

To search this archive, use the drop-down menu below. You can select a specific year, meeting or publication, and/or a specific topic, such as a type of cancer. Selecting "All" will take you to a complete list of articles that appear under all categories.

May 31, 2014

Early results from an ongoing study show that ibrutinib (Imbruvica) keeps relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) from worsening for longer than ofatumumab (Arzerra), a standard treatment option for relapsed or refractory CLL.

May 31, 2014

Results from a new study show that combining the targeted therapy ramucirumab (Cyramza) with standard chemotherapy lengthens the lives of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Targeted therapy is a treatment that targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival. 

May 30, 2014

According to new research, people who are expected to live less than a year can safely stop taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, without shortening their lives. In fact, discontinuing statins provided a number of important benefits, including reducing symptoms, having to take fewer pills, and improving overall quality of life.

May 30, 2014

A new study demonstrates the benefits of a phone-based palliative care support program for caregivers of people with advanced cancer. The results suggest that the earlier palliative care services are introduced to caregivers, the better they will be able to cope with the caregiving experience.

May 30, 2014

Early research suggests that lowering the dose of radiation therapy for some people with oropharyngeal cancer is an effective treatment option and may help reduce long-term side effects. This new approach customizes the radiation dose based on a person’s response to initial chemotherapy, as well as other factors known to affect a person’s chance of recovery, such as whether the tumor has tested positive for the human papillomavirus (HPV), the tumor’s size, and the person’s smoking history. 

May 30, 2014

According to new findings from a phase III clinical trial, women taking zoledronic acid (Zometa) for breast cancer that has spread to the bone, called metastases, can safely scale back to a once-every-three-months schedule after finishing a year of monthly treatments.

May 30, 2014

Results from a recent phase III clinical trial show that women who took goserelin (Zoladex) with chemotherapy for early-stage, hormone receptor-negative breast cancer were 64% less likely to develop premature ovarian failure, also called early menopause, compared with women who received chemotherapy alone. 

May 14, 2014

A recent data analysis showed that obesity increases the risk of death from estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer for women who have not been through menopause. 

May 14, 2014

A new model predicts that nationwide lung cancer screening for people enrolled in Medicare who have a high risk of the disease would double the percentage of early-stage lung cancers diagnosed over five years. In March 2014, the U.S Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that people age 55 to 80 with a high risk of lung cancer due to cigarette smoking receive screening for the disease each year with low dose computed tomography (CT).

May 14, 2014

Early-stage research suggests that a new targeted drug, PLX3397, could become a treatment option for people with a neoplastic joint disorder called pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). PVNS is a rare joint condition that usually affects the hip or knee, causing tumors to form in these joints that destroy joint tissue and cause severe, life-changing symptoms. PVNS is a type of uncontrollable cell growth, similar to a cancer, but it is not considered a cancer because it usually does not spread to other parts of the body.

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