SIOG 2020: New Research in Caring for and Treating People With Cancer Age 60 or Older

November 12, 2020
Brielle Gregory, ASCO staff

The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2020 Annual Meeting Online was held virtually on October 1. In this podcast, William Dale, MD, PhD, discusses 5 studies evaluating potentially better approaches to caring for and treating people with cancer who are 60 or older.

  • Findings from a U.S. study that used a home-based exercise program, called GO-EXCAP, for people with multiple myeloma over the age of 60 to help prevent side effects, such as fatigue, and a decline in physical function. [2:10]

  • Results from a study in Brazil observing whether practical geriatric assessments in a low-resource environment could be successfully done to help people with cancer. [3:45]

  • Findings from a Japanese study evaluating how common geriatric syndromes, which are health conditions affecting older adults such as cognitive problems and falls, were in people over the age of 65 with a history of cancer who live in community dwellings. [5:57]

  • Research from a U.S. study testing the use of extreme hypofractionated radiation therapy, or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), in people over the age of 70 with localized prostate cancer. [7:52]

  • Insights from a U.S. study that used a multidisciplinary approach to optimizing care for people with blood cancer over 60 who were being considered for a bone marrow transplant. [9:10]

Dr. Dale is a clinical professor, the Arthur M. Coppola Family Chair in Supportive Care Medicine, and director of the Center for Cancer and Aging at City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Duarte, California. He is also the 2020 Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Geriatric Oncology. View Dr. Dale’s disclosure information.

Was this podcast useful? Please subscribe, rate, and review Cancer.Net Podcasts on Apple Podcasts or Google Play. This prerecorded podcast can be listened to online or downloaded to your computer. A transcript is also available. For more information, visit the Cancer.Net podcast page.

Cancer.Net podcasts are edited for length and content.

Share your thoughts on this blog post on Cancer.Net's Facebook and Twitter.