New Research on Treating Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer From SABCS 2020

January 29, 2021
Brielle Gregory Collins, ASCO staff

The 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) was held virtually from December 8 to 11. In this podcast, Norah Lynn Henry, MD, PhD, FASCO, discusses the results from 4 clinical trials presented at the conference and what this research means for people with non-metastatic, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  • Results from the RxPONDER phase III clinical trial, which evaluated whether the combination of chemotherapy with hormonal therapy is the best treatment for people with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to 1 to 3 lymph nodes [2:22].

  • Updates on 2 studies -- MonarchE and PENELOPE-B -- evaluating the use of CDK4/6 inhibitors in treating people with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer who have a high risk of breast cancer recurrence after primary treatment. A CDK4/6 inhibitor is a type of targeted therapy that targets a protein in breast cancer cells called CDK4/6, which may stimulate cancer growth [5:00].

  • A 10-year follow-up on the PRIME II study from the United Kingdom, which observes whether radiation therapy helps prevent recurrence in women over 65 who have small, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer that has not spread to the lymph nodes [6:57].

Dr. Henry is an associate professor in the University of Michigan's Division of Hematology/Oncology in the Department of Internal Medicine. She is the breast oncology disease lead at the Rogel Cancer Center. Dr. Henry specializes in the care of patients with all stages of breast cancer. She is the 2021 Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Breast Cancer. View Dr. Henry’s disclosures.

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