Oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology

Screening

Combined HPV and Pap Testing Better Predict Risk of Cervical Cancer

ASCO Annual Meeting
May 18, 2011

A large study on combining human papillomavirus (HPV) and Pap testing for regular cervical cancer screening showed that it is safe for women to have cervical cancer screening every three years instead of every year. The study also showed that HPV testing identified more women at high risk for cervical cancer than Pap testing. HPV, a virus most commonly passed from person to person during sexual activity, is a major risk factor for cervical cancer.

New Way to Use PSA May Predict Risk of Metastatic Prostate Cancer or Prostate Cancer-Related Death

A large study of more than 12,000 Swedish men showed that first-time prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels for men age 44 to 50 predicts the chance of developing metastatic prostate cancer (cancer that has spread to other parts of the body) or dying of the disease up to 30 years later. PSA is found in higher-than-normal levels in men with various conditions of the prostate, including prostate cancer and noncancerous conditions.

Researchers Find Many Elderly Men Undergo Unnecessary PSA Screening

JCO Research Round Up
March 28, 2011

A new study on the use of PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing to screen for prostate cancer found that elderly men are being screened much more frequently than men in their early fifties, even though younger men are more likely to benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Researchers showed that men in their seventies underwent PSA screening for prostate cancer at nearly twice the rate of men in their early fifties. Men 85 and older were screened just as often.

Initial PSA Measurement Could Help Guide Further Prostate Cancer Testing

In a large European study, researchers looked at using first-time prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels as a way to guide future screening for prostate cancer. PSA is a protein found in higher-than-normal levels in men with prostate cancer and some noncancerous prostate conditions. Men with higher-than-normal PSA levels may be recommended for a biopsy (removal of a small piece of tissue for examination under a microscope) to look for cancer.

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