Research Summaries

Using the drop-down menu below, read about highlighted scientific news for patients from ASCO's Annual Meetings, Symposia, and medical journals for the past three years. You can select a specific year, meeting or publication, and/or a specific topic, such as a type of cancer. Selecting "All" will take you to a complete list of articles that appear under all categories.

This includes ASCO’s Journal of Clinical Oncology and its scientific meetings, including the ASCO Annual Meeting, a five-day meeting held each May/June. To read the Annual Meeting summaries compiled into a yearly newsletter, you can also review Research Round Up: News for Patients from the ASCO Annual Meeting.Don’t forget to check out audio podcasts and videos about this news, as well. And a list of upcoming Symposia can be found here. And, in addition to the highlighted studies below, thousands of scientific abstracts are released each year at different ASCO meetings. To search the entire collection of meeting abstracts, visit ASCO's website.

May 13, 2015

As part of an ongoing study, researchers found that a new immune-based treatment controlled the growth of multiple myeloma for longer than standard treatment. This new treatment, elotuzumab, works in two different ways to treat myeloma. It is able to directly target multiple myeloma cells and boost a part of the immune system that helps control the growth of cancer cells.

May 13, 2015

A large, ongoing study showed that men with advanced prostate cancer who received docetaxel (Docefrez, Taxotere) in addition to standard prostate cancer treatment lived longer than those who received only standard hormone therapy. The study also showed that including zoledronic acid (Zometa) along with docetaxel and standard hormone therapy did not offer additional benefits.

May 13, 2015

Two phase III Children’s Oncology Group studies found that using additional drugs with standard therapy lowered the chance that Wilms tumor with a specific genetic change returned after treatment. Wilms tumor is a rare type of cancer that begins in a child’s kidney. When it comes back after treatment, it is called a relapse or recurrence.

May 13, 2015

A recent study showed that people who took a form of vitamin B3 called nicotinamide developed fewer non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a low-cost vitamin supplement available over the counter. Previous research has suggested that nicotinamide helps protect skin cells from the sun and repair sun damage. 

February 23, 2015

A new study that analyzed data from more than 87,500 men with prostate cancer shows that the number diagnosed with higher-risk disease increased between 2011 and 2013. According to these results, the number of men diagnosed with either intermediate- or high-risk disease has increased by nearly 6% since 2011. These findings are interesting because in 2011 the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that PSA testing not be used for prostate cancer screening, regardless of a man’s age.

February 23, 2015

A recent study suggests that people with locally advanced kidney cancer should not take either sorafenib (Nexavar) or sunitinib (Sutent) after surgery. 

February 23, 2015

For many types of cancer, doctors are able to run laboratory tests to identify specific genes, proteins, and other factors unique to the tumor that help determine the best treatment option for each patient. However, there are currently no tests to help doctors select the best treatment option for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

February 23, 2015

After analyzing data from nearly 180,000 men collected in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, researchers have found that the risk of developing prostate cancer is higher in men who have already had testicular cancer than those who have not.

February 23, 2015

A new study that analyzed data from 945 men with prostate cancer raises questions about recommending active surveillance to men with intermediate-risk disease. 

January 12, 2015

A recent review of information from 145 patients with rectal cancer suggests that those who had no signs of cancer after receiving a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy could safely avoid or postpone surgery. 

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